wheat intolerance: it may not be gluten could be yeasts

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wheat intolerance: it may not be gluten could be yeasts

Postby Northern-Mom on Tue Oct 06, 2015 8:26 pm

Here is an article about how gluten intolerance may be about the yeast we use now and not the gluten. The other issue is how commercial bakeries almost always add extra gluten to whole wheat and even white breads to keep it light and fluffy.

Another reason for switching to wild fermentation.
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/02/bread-gluten-rising-yeast-health-problem
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Re: wheat intolerance: it may not be gluten could be yeasts

Postby Christopher Weeks on Wed Oct 07, 2015 7:09 am

The chapter on bread in Michael Pollan's Cooked suggests something like sourdough bread causes less gluten reaction than modern yeast-risen bread. I don't remember the details though.
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Re: wheat intolerance: it may not be gluten could be yeasts

Postby Tibor on Thu Oct 08, 2015 12:54 am

I have no idea if it's the gluten or the yeast in wheat bread that gets my gluten intolerant friends sick but I make a 100% sourdough rye bread that they have no problem with. It is a fermented sponge with no yeast. I am told that it has the tiniest amount of gluten that only people with celiac disease should avoid. It is also very flavorful and delicious .The recipe is in Sandor Katz's book Wild Fermentations.
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Re: wheat intolerance: it may not be gluten could be yeasts

Postby imightbemary on Wed Oct 14, 2015 9:13 am

If rye's not bothering them, it's possibly the gluten. Rye gets its structure from polysaccharides called pentosans rather than gluten, which is also why kneading rye bread isn't important--no gluten to develop. It does seem plausible to me that the wild yeasts in a sourdough starter would more thoroughly break down the troublesome gluten and improve digestibility than the monocultures found in commercial yeast. Especially given the longer fermentations of sourdough breads
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