cooking split peas

Miso, tamari, tempeh, idli/dosa, natto, and more!

Moderator: Christopher Weeks

cooking split peas

Postby veggieguy on Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:47 pm

Help!

When I ferment (yellow) split peas, they take forever to cook.

I used to be able to cook them in 1.5 to two hours (unfermented), but four hours is not enough under the same conditions when they've been fermented overnight. I've tried: rinsing away the fermented solution, and, just including that during cooking: no difference.

Suggestions? (And, any explanation for why they're so much harder to cook?)

vg
veggieguy
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:39 pm

Re: cooking split peas

Postby Tim Hall on Sun Sep 08, 2013 4:12 pm

Beans (and I assume peas) can sometimes take longer to soften during cooking, if acidified (fermented). That just seems to be the way it goes. The other possibility is the peas are old - it seems that old legumes take longer to cook as well. There is some contention as to whether salting beans before cooking may also increase cook time.

Miso gets nice and soft, but it get's fermented (and salted) after the legumes are cooked. Same with tempeh and natto.
Tim Hall
Long-Lost Keeper of the Keys
 
Posts: 1013
Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2008 4:18 pm
Location: N32.75 W97.34

Re: cooking split peas

Postby veggieguy on Wed Sep 11, 2013 3:26 pm

Well, I guess the fermenting process destroys whatever speeded up their cooking when unfermented. These are dry, split yellow peas (a staple of mine for over a decade), and I've only recently tried fermenting them (having had good success with fermenting brown rice).

But, it's looking like it's not a viable approach. Next batch as a last resort I'll try cooking half & half (half fermented, half not fermented in the same pot). Just maybe whatever enzymes are involved in breaking down the peas will suffice for the whole batch (and if that works, I'll see how low a proportion of unfermented soaked/rinsed split peas will suffice).

vg
veggieguy
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:39 pm

Re: cooking split peas

Postby Aliyanna on Wed Sep 11, 2013 3:47 pm

I always soak my peas and pulses at least 24 hrs. They seem to ferment and cook better.

I use yellow peas and lentils to make a sour dough type bread and they never take more than 15 min to bake.
Aliyanna
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 6:05 pm

Re: cooking split peas

Postby Tim Hall on Wed Sep 11, 2013 3:57 pm

Veggieguy, FYI "cooking" temperature is probably going to be high enough to destroy most of those enzymes within a few minutes. The enzymes that break down proteins (this is an educated guess) probably operate best around 100-130F, enzymes that break down starches around 140-160F. Above their respective ranges the enzymes themselves start to break down quickly.

Theoretically (assuming there are enough of those enzymes present, and that my numbers are right) you could cook the legumes for a period of time within these ranges, then finish the cook with a higher temperature. This is similar to the way barley is "mashed" for brewing beer.

Alternately: you could try sprouting the peas, cook them until "done," but still firm, and ferment them after cooking...then only briefly re-cook them.

The thing is there's a lot of talk about healthy enzymes and anti-nutrients and whatnot, which might be just a bit overblown, depending one's agenda, or which philosophy one is trying to sell. The reality is there may not be a simple or efficient way to achieve a sort of maximum theoretical nutritiousness with any particular food source. That we know of certain things in our food, such as a particular nutrient or vitamin or mineral or phytate, is a relatively new thing...and what all that knowledge/information actually means for our bodies is still very theoretical.

On the other hand, if you come up with some creative way of solving your particular problem, let us know.
Tim Hall
Long-Lost Keeper of the Keys
 
Posts: 1013
Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2008 4:18 pm
Location: N32.75 W97.34

Re: cooking split peas

Postby veggieguy on Fri Sep 13, 2013 10:48 pm

These are 'split' yellow peas (not gonna sprout, of that I guarantee). Chosen because they're the cheapest readily available legume sold locally ($0.29/100 grams, or about $1.32/pound), sold in 'bulk' bins.

Don't know what to make of this talk of 'temperature' and enzymes breaking down (though, I'm a former chemist, so I understand the words just not how they apply to my observations), for me it's purely 'scientific method' (observation + reproducible results). I bring them to a 'simmer' (pretty much 200+ deg. F), and set a timer. Works great when they're not fermented, has been a huge problem when fermented even at double / nearly triple the cooking duration.

Today I've split them into two batches (fermented vs merely soaked). Will cook tomorrow as one large combined batch. Soaking is from 2 to 24 hours, soaking+fermenting for something like 12-24 hours (both at room temperature). As with fermenting brown rice, I pour off (decant) and refrigerate some of the liquid for the next fermenting effort (seems more thorough; a bit 'ripe' smelling while cooking for either variation and the rice for that matter, but no neighbour complaints so far).

Crossing my fingers.

vg
veggieguy
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:39 pm

Re: cooking split peas

Postby bravebird on Wed Sep 18, 2013 9:59 am

well i sprouted my yellow split peas about 2 weeks ago. most of them indeed sprouted. i thought they wouldnt either. i used them to make dhal. tasty!
bravebird
 
Posts: 76
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 2:44 pm


Return to Legume Ferments

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests